Canada-U.S. Blog Trade Lawyers Cyndee Todgham Cherniak and Susan K. Ross

Tag Archives: CITT

The Government of Canada Has Not Appointed Needed Canadian International Trade Tribunal Members

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Customs Law, Government Procurement

Canada is nearing a trade law crisis point that, quite frankly, is avoidable and easily solved.  There are too few permanent members of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) for the workload.  Section 3 of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act provides for the appointment of a Chairman and six (6) permanent members to the… Continue Reading

Companies Who Did Not Export Dumped or Subsidized Goods Should Ask CITT or Minister of Finance To Be Removed From Order

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

On December 8, 2017, in LE-2017-003, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) decided to not initiate an expiry review (Canada’s sunset review) with respect to carbon steel welded pipe manufactured by Conares Metal Supply Ltd. (“Conares”) from the United Arab Emirates. The CITT found that an expiry review was warranted with respect to carbon steel… Continue Reading

Canada Commences PET Resin Antidumping/Countervailing Duty Injury Inquiry

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

On November 17, 2017, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) announced the commencement of the antidumping/countervailing duty injury inquiry in respect of polyethylene terephthalate resin (PET resin) originating in or exported from China, India, Oman, and Pakistan. The Subject Goods are defined as “PET resin having an intrinsic viscosity of at least 0.70 deciliters per gram but not more… Continue Reading

What is the Canadian International Trade Tribunal?

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Customs Law, Government Procurement, origin, tariff classification, Trade Remedies, valuation

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (also known as the “CITT”) is an independent, Canadian quasi-judicial administrative tribunal that adjudicates a variety of international trade cases and matters. The CITT is the place to go to receive a fair, timely, transparent and effective resolution of a trade-related dispute and/or government-mandated inquiry/dispute, provided that the trade-related dispute is… Continue Reading

Why The U.S. Should Want To Keep NAFTA Chapter 19: Canada’s FCA Significantly Limits Judicial Review in Trade Remedies Cases

Posted in Antidumping, Legal Developments, NAFTA Renegotiations, Trade Remedies

On August 29, 2017, Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal (the second highest court in Canada) issued two decisions dismissing two judicial reviews (one filed by a Korean exporter and the other filed by a Canadian producer) of Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) antidumping calculations on grounds of a lack of jurisdiction.  These cases and the… Continue Reading

Canada Initiates New Antidumping/Subsidy Case Against PET Resin from China, Oman, India and Pakistan

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Trade Remedies

On August 18, 2017, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) issued a Notice of Initiation stating that it has initiated both an antidumping investigation and a subsidy investigation against PET Resin from China, India, Oman and Pakistan. The subject goods are defined as follows: “Polyethylene terephthalate (“PET”) resin having an intrinsic viscosity of at least… Continue Reading

Canada Commences Review Of Carbon Welded Steel Pipe Order After WTO DSB Panel Report

Posted in Antidumping, World Trade Organization

In December 2016, Canada lost a World Trade Organization (“WTO”) dispute (Canada – Anti-Dumping Measures on Imports of Certain Carbon Steel Welded Pipe from the Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen and Matsu (DS482)) concerning the Canadian International Trade Tribunal injury determination in the Carbon Steel Welded Pipe case NQ-2012-003 (which involved Chinese Taipei, the Republic… Continue Reading

Canada Starts AD Expiry Review Re Liquid Dielectric Transformers

Posted in Antidumping

On July 25, 2017, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) initiated an expiry review relating to its November 20, 2012 Order imposing antidumping duties on liquid dielectric transformers originating in or exported from South Korea (CITT File No. NQ-2012-001, continued without amendment in RD-2013-003).  The CITT Order was issued on November 20, 2012. What goods are at issue… Continue Reading

Who Has The Burden Of Proof In A Canadian Customs Appeal?

Posted in Customs Law, tariff classification, Uncategorized

On July 18, 2017, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) posted its decision in Schlumberger Canada Limited v. President of the Canada Border Services Agency (CITT Appeal No. AP-2015-022).  In this decision, the Tribunal opined on who has the burden of proof in tariff classification appeals. First, it is important to know that, in… Continue Reading

Canada’s New AD/CVD Scope Ruling Process Allows The CBSA To Expand Subject Goods Definition

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Trade Remedies

Canada has added a new “Scope Ruling” process to Canada’s antidumping/countervailing duty regime in Bill C-44 “An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures” (also known as “Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1”). Bill C-44 received Royal Assent on June 22, 2017.  The “other measures” include… Continue Reading

A Reason For Foreign Producers To Participate In Canada’s Trade Remedies Cases

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

Bill C-44 “An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures” (also known as “Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1”) has received Royal Assent (on June 22, 2017).  The “other measures” include amendments to the Special Import Measures Act (Canada’s trade remedies law).  The measures… Continue Reading

Does The Canadian International Trade Tribunal Review Intra-Canada Government Procurement Disputes Under The Canadian Free Trade Agreement?

Posted in Government Procurement, Uncategorized

It looks like the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) has not yet been selected by the Federal Government of Canada or any province or territory as the reviewing authority under Chapter Five of the Canadian Free Trade Agreement (Canada’s new and improved internal trade agreement).  The Canadian Free Trade Agreement quietly entered into effect on… Continue Reading

Three Notices of Application For Judicial Review Filed Against CITT FISC Decision

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

On May 25, 2017, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) made an AD Order in respect of fabricated industrial steel components (“FISC”) originating in or exported from China, South Korea and Spain and made a CVD Order in respect of FISC originating in or exported from China.  On June 9, 2017, the CITT issued its… Continue Reading

Exporters Who Receive De Minimis Dumping Margins in Canadian AD Cases Now Being Excluded From Final Orders

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies, World Trade Organization

Foreign producers and exporters who receive a de minimis dumping margin (2% or less) in a Canadian antidumping case are now being excluded from final injury orders (that is, final orders for the imposition of antidumping duties).  What this means is that any foreign producer or exporter who priced at undumped levels (above domestic selling… Continue Reading

The CBSA (as Administrator of Laws) Must Follow CITT Decisions (Subject to Limited Exceptions)

Posted in Antidumping, Cross-border litigation, Customs Law, Government Procurement, Imports Restrictions

This case is a must-read for all customs and trade lawyers.  This case is a must- read by other administrative lawyers who appear before quasi-judicial tribunals. The general administrative law rules for law enforcers and tribunals have been clarified in simple, understandable terms. May there be greater certainty, greater predictability and finality as a result of this… Continue Reading

What Is A CITT Section 18 Reference?

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Legal Developments, Trade Remedies

On October 17, 2016, Canada’s Department of Finance announced that the Government of Canada had asked the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) to conduct an inquiry (actually, it is a Reference) in respect of the antidumping case involving gypsum board from the United States and imported into Western Canada in order to hear from a… Continue Reading

Canada Acknowledges Antidumping Proceedings Hurt Consumers

Posted in Antidumping, Canada's Federal Government, Trade Remedies

This has never happened before.  This is very important.  Trade lawyers outside Canada (and inside Canada) will be shocked by the steps being taken in Canada during an active antidumping proceeding. On October 16, 2016, the Department of Finance asked the Canadian International Trade Tribunal to commence a section 18 (of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal… Continue Reading

What Did The Supreme Court of Canada Say About Appeals of CITT Tariff Classification Decisions?

Posted in Uncategorized

On September 29, 2016, the Supreme Court of Canada upheld a decision of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) as reasonable.  In Attorney General of Canada v. Igloo Vikski Inc., the majority of the Supreme Court of Canada held that imported hockey gloves should be classified as “gloves, mittens and mitts” under tariff item 6216.00.00 and… Continue Reading

Importers Can Play The Game Too – Preparing Call Reports To Record Communications

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

In antidumping injury cases in Canada, the domestic industry often include confidential call reports in their submissions to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal. The call reports document conversations and meetings with importers/distributors and customers in which the customer or distributor asks for a price reduction or says the price offered is too high.  The domestic… Continue Reading

BE AWARE: Homeowners and Contractors in Western Canada Will Be Surprised By Antidumping Duties on U.S. Drywall

Posted in Uncategorized

Many homeowners and contractors in Western Canada will soon be asking “Why do I have to pay antidumping duties on imports of gypsum board or drywall?” This is because there is an antidumping case in Canada on gypsum board imported from the United States into Western provinces. Starting on September 6, 2016, imports of drywall/gypsum… Continue Reading

Canadian International Trade Tribunal Issues Practice Notice On Filing Questionnaire Replies

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

On June 10, 2016, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) issued a Practice Notice entitled “Filing of Questionnaire Replies and Revisions and Issuance of Revised Investigation Report”.  In antidumping and countervailing duty injury inquiries, the CITT issues questionnaires to producers, importers, foreign producers and purchasers.  The CITT compiles the information and data provided by respondents… Continue Reading

Canada Initiates Antidumping Case Against Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Several Countries

Posted in Antidumping, Trade Remedies

On August 19, 2016, the Canada Border Services Agency announced an antidumping investigation against concrete reinforcing bar (also known as rebar) from Republic of Belarus, Chinese Taipei, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, Japan, the Portuguese Republic and the Kingdom of Spain.  In 2014, provisional antidumping duties were imposed… Continue Reading

What Is The Difference Between A Red/Green Olive And A Black Olive?

Posted in Agriculture, Customs Law, tariff classification

The answer to this question is found in the recent Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“Tribunal”) tariff classification appeal case of Délices de la Forêt Inc. v. President of the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”), AP-2015-018. The issue in this case was whether green and red olives in brine in a glass jar were properly classified… Continue Reading