The Government of Canada has determined that the trusted traveler programs are not essential and have closed NEXUS Processing Centres for an undetermined period of time.  This means that if a Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) officer mistakenly confiscates a NEXUS Card from a traveler and sends it to a NEXUS Processing Centre, the traveler

At midnight on March 20, 2020, in an attempt to control the spread of COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic, Canada and the United States closed their shared border to non-essential travel for a period of thirty (30) days (which can be extended to a longer period of time).  “Non-essential” travel includes travel that is considered tourism

We have recently become aware of 4 cases where individuals (mostly Canadians) have been notified that their NEXUS memberships have been cancelled by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“U.S. CBP”) because they failed to declare the export of a vehicle from the United States.  The three scenarios where this has arisen are:

1) A Canadian

On October 25, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) announced that they were modernizing NEXUS kiosks across Canada, starting with Vancouver airport, to use facial recognition technology.  Hidden in the announcement is the following significant NEXUS Program rule change:

“It is also important to note that declarations will not be completed at the new

The answer is “possibly”.  It is possible that the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) will confiscate your NEXUS membership if the Primary CBSA Officer or a Secondary CBSA Officer smells cannabis in your vehicle.  Even though cannabis can be sold legally in Canada and in many U.S. states, it is not legal to import cannabis

On June 7, 2019, Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal (FCA) confirmed in Chen v. Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, 2019 FCA 170, that the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) cannot seize goods that were imported more than 6 years ago (even if the duties were not paid). In Chen, the

The Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) has the power to issue fines of up to $CDN 1,300 if you fail to report meat in your possession.  The CBSA has the authority to examine goods in the possession on travelers arriving in Canada and airports, land border crossings and at other ports of entry. The CBSA

The use of cannabis is legal in Canada. The Cannabis Act, Bill C-45, was passed by Canada’s House of Commons on November 27, 2018 and the Senate on June 7, 2018.  Bill C-45 received royal assent on June 21, 2018.  Most provisions of the Cannabis Act entered into force on October 17, 2018.