Canada-U.S. Blog Trade Lawyers Cyndee Todgham Cherniak and Susan K. Ross

Category Archives: Corporate Counsel

Subscribe to Corporate Counsel RSS Feed

BEWARE OF THE WHISTLEBLOWER!

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Anti-Trust/Competition Law, Antidumping, Border Security, Buy America, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border litigation, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Excise Duty, Excise Tax, Government Procurement, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, U.S. Federal Government, Uncategorized

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in February 2018 Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) and other federal enforcement agencies seizing goods or imposing penalties is not unexpected. However, there are other consequences triggered by the actions of private actors which present equal danger to importers. In particular,  there is the False Claims Act (“FCA”),… Continue Reading

Is your organization ready for the new CPTPP?

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, CPTPP, TPP-1, Trade Agreeements

On January 23, 2018, Canada, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam reached an agreement in principle for a multi-country free trade area. The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement has been renamed and will be called the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (“CPTPP”). We don’t yet know when the CPTPP… Continue Reading

New Tariffs: Trade War Washing Ashore?

Posted in Antidumping, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Imports Restrictions, Legal Developments, Trade Remedies, World Trade Organization

Yesterday, January 22, 2018, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer announced the imposition of safeguard tariffs on solar cells and modules.  Much has been said in the general press about this case, but only now is the key point starting to register, and is something international traders immediately thought about  – is President Trump starting… Continue Reading

We have a Deal: What are the next steps for Canada to implement the CPTPP?

Posted in Agriculture, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, CPTPP, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, TPP-1

On January 23, 2018, Canada and Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam reached an agreement in principle that is the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (“CPTPP”) (formerly known as the TransPacific Partnership Agreement, TPP, TTTP-1, and TPP-11). The United States withdrew from TPP in January… Continue Reading

Border Searches of Electronic Devices

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Border Security, Constitutional Law, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

Earlier this month, MSK attorneys David Rugendorf and Frida Glucoft published an Alert summarizing the latest directive issued by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regarding the search of electronic devices.  A copy of their original article can be found here –  Hold That Call International Travelers.  Given the  increasing likelihood of any traveler’s electronic devices… Continue Reading

He Said What ?????

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Antidumping, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Currency Reporting, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Government Procurement, Harmonization, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, Proceeds of Crime/Money Laundering, Trade Remedies

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in December 2017 While Special Counsel Robert Mueller continues his investigation, the recent guilty plea entered by Trump former National Security Advisor Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn (Ret.) serves as a reminder that when you are interviewed by a law enforcement agent, you better be sure what you say… Continue Reading

Compliance Incentive: Canada to appoint a Canadian Ombudsman for Responsible Enterprise

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Anti-Trust/Competition Law, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Cryptocurrencies, Environment, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Legal Developments

On January 17, 2018, the Government of Canada furthered its “progressive trade agenda” and responded to calls from human rights groups by announcing that it is going to watch the activities of Canadian businesses operating in overseas markets more seriously.  The Government of Canada will create an Office of the Canadian Ombudsman for Responsible Enterprise… Continue Reading

Should Canada add a books and records provision to export controls and economic sanctions laws?

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Cryptocurrencies, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption

Countries, such as North Korea, Iran and Russia, may attempt to hide activities by using cryptocurrencies (such as Bitcoin). While the underlying activity of selling controlled goods or dealing with designated persons is illegal (under Canadian export laws) without an export permit/ministerial authorization, a secondary issue is enforcement.  Enforcement tools directed at “following the money”… Continue Reading

NAFTA Termination? What is your Strategy?

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Canada-EU CETA, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, NAFTA, NAFTA Renegotiations, Trade Agreeements, U.S. Federal Government

Will President Trump terminate NAFTA?  Unfortunately, we don’t know.  Some days, press reports suggest a growing possibility that he will take steps to terminate the agreement.  Other days, President Trump’s pronouncements hint that he may be prepared to further negotiations. This leaves organizations in a difficult position.  If President Trump does issue a notification of… Continue Reading

Ask Questions Before You Market Access into Canada?

Posted in AMPs, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, GST/HST, origin, Sales Taxes, tariff classification, valuation

Many U.S. and foreign companies that sell goods on Internet-based retail platforms (both in-house platforms and Amazon-type platforms) should ask more questions as they access Canada’s consumer market.  Often, the first question asked by the foreign company is how to access the Canadian market (as they see dollar signs).  After they foreign company figures out… Continue Reading

Canada Has Many Export Controls/ Economic Sanctions Lists

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports

Canada has made many lists and you may have to look at more than one list before exporting goods.  Which lists you must look at depends upon the destination country, the identity of buyer (including related parties), what specifically you are selling to your buyer (the good and its component parts), and the industry in… Continue Reading

A “Catch 22” For Canadian Corporations Trading With Cuba – Canada’s Foreign Extraterritorial Measures Act –

Posted in Corporate Counsel, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports

It is legal under Canadian law for Canadian persons, including Canadian corporation, branches of U.S. companies and subsidiaries of U.S. companies to do business with Cuba. Canadian persons and Canadians outside Canada may sell goods and services to Cuba, with the exception of goods covered by Canada’s export control and economic sanctions laws. For example,… Continue Reading

Are You Asking The Right Questions When You Travel With Electronic Devices?

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel

  Technology is wonderful. Laptop computers are getting lighter.  Storage capacity on laptop computers, smart phones, USB keys and other electronic devices are up in the terabytes.   You can travel with your electronic devices and no one will know you are not in the office. What this means is that we can travel with vast… Continue Reading

Money, Money, Who Owes the Money?

Posted in Antidumping, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Legal Developments

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in October 2017 You receive an invoice from Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for additional duty assessed on an entry. When do you have to pay it?  Presumably the answer is within thirty (30) days, but maybe not! One of the members of the trade bar was recently… Continue Reading

Tips for Traveling with Electronic Devices

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Border Security, Constitutional Law, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Cybersecurity and Privacy, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Legal Developments, Transportation

In the September 18, 2017 Federal Register notice (see 82 FR 43556) , U.S. Citizenship and Immigration made clear it will now routinely require those applying to enter the U.S. to provide social media handles. As such, the obvious starting point for these tips must be a reminder that Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) officers… Continue Reading

Walking the North Korean Tightrope

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, Transportation

On September 21, 2017, President Trump issued an Executive Order (yet to be numbered) (“EO”) imposing additional sanctions on North Korea. It took affect the next day. The general press has quoted Treasury Secretary Mnuchin as stating: “Foreign financial institutions are now on notice that going forward they can choose to do business with the… Continue Reading

Solar Flare Up with China

Posted in Antidumping, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Imports Restrictions, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

Two actions took place at the end of last week which heighten concerns that a trade war with China could be ever more likely.  First, there was the preliminary decision in the solar panels 201 case.  Then, we had the additional sanctions imposed by the President on North Korea. The 201 solar panel case began… Continue Reading

What Are Canada’s Tariff Codes (As At September 14, 2017)?

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Canada-EU CETA, Canada-Ukraine FTA, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, origin

Canada does not have a single customs duty or tariff rate for all imports. Over the years, Canada has entered into a number of free trade agreements.  A tariff rate code is assigned for every free trade agreement partner because tariff elimination commitments and tariff reduction schedules cause applicable tariff rates to be different from… Continue Reading

CBP : Old Issues / New Tricks!

Posted in Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports, Imports Restrictions, Legal Developments, origin, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in September 2017. As the scoundrels of the world are ever more creative with their attempts to circumvent the law, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) responds by implementing new tools.  One new tool is worth considering and one existing tool is worth revisiting. The new enforcement tool is… Continue Reading

Can the CBSA Search My Electronic Devices?

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law

We are often contacted by travelers after they have been selected (random or mandatory) for a secondary examination by the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) upon arrival at the Canadian border. Usually, the traveler had something on a laptop computer or smart phone that they did not want the CBSA to see or use against them… Continue Reading

The CBSA Should Respect Solicitor-Client Privilege At The Canadian Border

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law

The Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) does have an internal policy with respect to examinations and searches of lawyers who are crossing the border into Canada.  This internal policy (Operational Bulletin PRG-2014-07 “Examination of Solicitor-Client Privileged Materials”) is not publicly available on the CBSA web-site, so we posted it.  It is available through Access to… Continue Reading

What is in a Name?

Posted in Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Government Procurement, Imports Restrictions, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, Uncategorized

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in August 2017. We are now a few months (almost 7) into Mr. Trump’s Presidency and it is still not clear  – what is the Administration’s trade policy?   The general press is rife with stories about the warring factions within the Administration – those who xenophobically want to… Continue Reading

Trading with China – New Reasons To Be Wary!

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Anti-Trust/Competition Law, Antidumping, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, Environment, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Labour, Legal Developments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

Yesterday, August 2, 2017, President Trump signed into law H.R. 3364, the “Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act”.  The general press is covering this story by writing about Russia’s initial retaliation taking the form of cutting the staff authorized at the U.S. embassy in Moscow and the seizure of certain U.S. diplomatic property within Russia. … Continue Reading