Government Procurement

In the June 20, 2019 pre-publication edition of the Federal Register, the U.S. Trade Representative announced the long awaited process for seeking exclusions for goods on List 3, the one which recently went from 10% to 25%.  While the exclusion process itself generally mirrors the process applied to those goods on Lists 1 and 2,

In March, there was a good deal of consternation in the general press trying to understand news that President Trump had overruled the actions of the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) to impose additional sanctions on North Korea. Beside the oddity of a President overruling actions by a part of the Executive branch after

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in March 2019

On the trade with China front this week, the news is Huawei Technologies Co, of China sued the U.S. government regarding provisions in the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (“NDAA”).  The timing of the lawsuit is drawing interest as

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in February 2019

Of all the questions asked of trade attorneys, this is likely the most frequent one.  The answer is both a study in current events, but also much more complex.  Let’s start at the obvious beginning point. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) receives advance information about

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2019 was signed into law on Friday, February 15, 2019, so the potential for another shutdown was averted, but there was a hidden gem buried in a related document. This new law contains a specific appropriation for the U.S. Trade Representative’s office which reads: “For necessary expenses of the Office

Over the weekend, President Trump announced a deal with China. The result is the 10% tariff imposed on goods on List 3 of Chinese made goods will remain in place for an additional 90 days rather than increase to 25% on January 1, 2019. The challenge is there was no joint communique issued by the

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in November 2018

One of the many frustrations facing international traders trying to import goods into the U.S. is whether or not they will be accepted as importer of record by Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”).   CBP established a program to deal with what it views as the

Canada

On June 29, 2018, Canada released its list of products on which retaliation will be taken against the 232 steel and aluminum tariffs imposed by the U.S. Table 1 products are subject to a 25% surcharge. While the products listed on Tables 2 and 3 are subject to a 10% surcharge. See Canada 232

In the current tit for tat environment that overhangs international trade, below is an update regarding the 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum, the 301 tariffs related to China’s intellectual property rights and other business practices, and the 232 tariffs threatened on automobiles and parts.

Steel and Aluminum Tariffs:

As everyone by now knows,

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in April 2018

The brewing trade war between the U.S. and China serves as a reminder to international traders that knowing where your goods are made and being able to prove it are two very different issues.  At a time when it remains common place for U.S. Customs