Direct sellers (also known as network sellers) enter the lucrative Canadian market, often without asking questions about whether there are any Canadian laws they should know about. Canadians sign up as independent sales contractors and start to build their sales networks before all questions are asked and answers are received about compliance with Canadian laws. 

The Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) conducts verifications (also known as audits) to verify compliance with Canadian customs laws.  Importers self-report relevant and detailed information about their imports either directly or through customs brokers.  The CBSA conducts verifications to ensure that the information is correct and that the importer has paid the correct amount of

On May 10, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) posted Customs Notice 19-08 “Final Safeguard Measures on the Importation of Certain Steel Goods”.  Effective May 13, 2019, Canada will impose definitive safeguard duties on Heavy Plate and Stainless Steel Wire for a period of 3 years. Canada is imposing tariff rate quotas

At midnight, the United States increased tariff rates on many goods from China from 10% to 25% (referred to as the “U.S. Trump Tariffs”).  The U.S. Trump Tariffs are a form of customs duty that is payable by the importer and is passed on to U.S. consumers.

As a result of the new higher U.S.

Late in the evening on September 30, 2018, the United States, Canada and Mexico announced the conclusion of negotiations of the United States – Mexico – Canada Agreement (”USMCA”) (also known as NAFTA 2.0). While the text of USMCA remains to be finalized, formally signed and ratified by each of the three countries, a preliminary

On May 30, 2018, Canada’s Minister of Finance announced new marking rules for steel and aluminum products.  In a News Release entitled “Canada Bolsters Prevention of Transshipment and Diversion of Steel and Aluminum Products Through Country of Origin Marking Regime“, the Department of Finance announced that Canada was aligning its marking rules with

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in April 2018

The brewing trade war between the U.S. and China serves as a reminder to international traders that knowing where your goods are made and being able to prove it are two very different issues.  At a time when it remains common place for U.S. Customs

Canada

This is a common problem – too common.  The people in the company responsible for customs and trade compliance do not work closely with the computer programmers as software is being developed — and mistakes are made.  The computer programmer does his or her job in preparing the code, but does not have any

Anyone who watches “The Big Bang Theory” knows about Schrödinger’s cat.  The cat was both thought to be dead and thought to be not dead at the same time.  There is a similar paradox for Canadian companies who sell to the United States and/or China.  Canadian goods may be thought to be not subject to

Canada

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Trump Tax Act”).  The Trump Tax Act materially changes U.S. corporate tax laws and incentivizes U.S. companies with overseas operations to either return home to the United States and/or repatriate money home to the United States.

As companies are attempting