On November 8, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency initiated an antidumping and subsidy case against certain corrosion resistant (galvanized) steel from Turkey, the united Arab Emirates and Vietnam.  This is the second corrosion resistant steel case in 18 months.  The last corrosion resistant steel case was against China, Taiwan, South Korean and India.  In

On October 29, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency announced the start of the expiry review (Canada’s sunset review process) of the antidumping and countervailing duty order against carbon steel fasteners from China (AD/CVD) and Taiwan (only AD). The AD/CVD duties have been in effect since January 2005.  We were involved in the original investigation

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) has changed their website and have added a page listing all the target dates for expiry reviews (5 year sunset reviews) of existing antidumping and countervailing duty orders.

This is helpful to importers and foreign producers because Canada made changes to the Special Import Measures Act a few years

On July 19, 2019, Finance Canada announced public consultations regarding proposed changes to the Special Import Measures Regulations and issued a backgrounder.  The proposed changes are in response to submissions by the Canadian steel industry earlier in 2019.  The time period for consultations is very short – submissions are due no later than August

On May 30, 2018, Canada’s Minister of Finance announced new marking rules for steel and aluminum products.  In a News Release entitled “Canada Bolsters Prevention of Transshipment and Diversion of Steel and Aluminum Products Through Country of Origin Marking Regime“, the Department of Finance announced that Canada was aligning its marking rules with

There is a new/formalized antidumping (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) procedure in Canada.  Importers may now request a formal AD/CVD Scope Ruling from the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”).  Only the CBSA can make Scope Rulings relating to a Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) AD/CVD Order.  Importers should consider filing a request for a Scope

Canada is nearing a trade law crisis point that, quite frankly, is avoidable and easily solved.  There are too few permanent members of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) for the workload.  Section 3 of the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act provides for the appointment of a Chairman and six (6) permanent members to the

In a result that was shocking to most, on Friday, January 26, 2018, the International Trade Commission announced a finding of NO material injury to American industry (read Boeing) and so voted to NOT impose either antidumping or countervailing duty on Bombardier’s 100 to 150 seat jets.  This brings to an end a very high

Yesterday, January 22, 2018, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer announced the imposition of safeguard tariffs on solar cells and modules.  Much has been said in the general press about this case, but only now is the key point starting to register, and is something international traders immediately thought about  – is President Trump starting

U.S.A.

On December 20, 2017, Canada filed a Request for Consultations with the World Trade Organization (“WTO”) setting out various concerns with the application of U.S. trade remedies that Canada considers to be inconsistent with WTO rules.   On January 10, 2018, the Chairman of the Dispute Settlement Body circulated a communication of Canada’s 32 page