Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in November 2018

One of the many frustrations facing international traders trying to import goods into the U.S. is whether or not they will be accepted as importer of record by Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”).   CBP established a program to deal with what it views as the

Canada

On September, 2018, the United States, Canada, and Mexico announced that a new NAFTA was agreed and would be called the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) (also known as NAFTA 2.0).  The text of the USMCA was posted on the United States Trade Representative website. LexSage has published an USMCA Resource Guide with USMCA Chapters,

Late in the evening on September 30, 2018, the United States, Canada and Mexico announced the conclusion of negotiations of the United States – Mexico – Canada Agreement (”USMCA”) (also known as NAFTA 2.0). While the text of USMCA remains to be finalized, formally signed and ratified by each of the three countries, a preliminary

On August 1, 2018, USTR Lighthizer issued a press release indicating he was following through with President Trump’s direction and will consider raising the rate of duty from 10% to 25% on those products on China 301 List 3. A formal notice in the Federal Register is expected soon.

Mr. Lighthizer also announced the written

Late on July 10, 2018, U.S. Trade Representative Lighthizer released a list of the next Chinese-made products targeted for additional duties, this time at a 10% rate and worth about $200 billion.  The statement in support of this action can be found here: USTR Statement Supporting China 301 List 3; and the list of

Canada

On June 29, 2018, Canada released its list of products on which retaliation will be taken against the 232 steel and aluminum tariffs imposed by the U.S. Table 1 products are subject to a 25% surcharge. While the products listed on Tables 2 and 3 are subject to a 10% surcharge. See Canada 232

In the current tit for tat environment that overhangs international trade, below is an update regarding the 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum, the 301 tariffs related to China’s intellectual property rights and other business practices, and the 232 tariffs threatened on automobiles and parts.

Steel and Aluminum Tariffs:

As everyone by now knows,

The Federal Register notice advising the timeline which applies to the Administration’s 232 investigation regarding automobiles and parts was published on May 30, 2018.  The relevant time frame requires that written comments are due by June 22, 2018 and rebuttal comments by July 6, 2018.  A public hearing will be held on July 19 and

Canada

This client alert was originally published on May 30, 2018, and now there is an update. Today, May 31st, President Trump announced a resolution with Argentina, Brazil and Australia regarding the 232 tariffs on steel (25%) and/or aluminum (10%), but as there is no similar agreement with Canada, Mexico or the EU, the tariffs

U.S.A.

On May 31, 2108, President Trump issued two Presidential Proclamations, which impose steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada. All exports of covered steel will be subject to a 25% import tariff (Canadian steel into the United States) and all exports of covered aluminum products will be subject to a 10% tariff (Canadian aluminum