Government Procurement

Over the weekend, President Trump announced a deal with China. The result is the 10% tariff imposed on goods on List 3 of Chinese made goods will remain in place for an additional 90 days rather than increase to 25% on January 1, 2019. The challenge is there was no joint communique issued by the

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in November 2018

One of the many frustrations facing international traders trying to import goods into the U.S. is whether or not they will be accepted as importer of record by Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”).   CBP established a program to deal with what it views as the

Canada

On June 29, 2018, Canada released its list of products on which retaliation will be taken against the 232 steel and aluminum tariffs imposed by the U.S. Table 1 products are subject to a 25% surcharge. While the products listed on Tables 2 and 3 are subject to a 10% surcharge. See Canada 232

In the current tit for tat environment that overhangs international trade, below is an update regarding the 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum, the 301 tariffs related to China’s intellectual property rights and other business practices, and the 232 tariffs threatened on automobiles and parts.

Steel and Aluminum Tariffs:

As everyone by now knows,

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in April 2018

The brewing trade war between the U.S. and China serves as a reminder to international traders that knowing where your goods are made and being able to prove it are two very different issues.  At a time when it remains common place for U.S. Customs

Since this article was originally published by MSK, we have learned China filed a complaint at the WTO challenging imposition of the threatened 301 tariffs. This WTO challenge is in addition to the one previously filed challenging the 232 tariffs the U.S. imposed.

The U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) has prepared for publication a Federal Register

In off the record comments on March 28, 2018, an official of the Dept. of Commerce provided some clarification as to how the product exemption process will work. Of course, the starting point is if your product is subject to the steel or aluminum tariffs and is not from an exempted country, the 25% or

Since the original publication of this Alert, South Korea and the U.S. have concluded their negotiations regarding the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, and, as a result, South Korea has been permanently excluded from the steel and aluminum tariffs.

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Some events rather significant to international traders occurred in the last few days. First, on Friday,

When President Trump announced the 25% steel and 10% aluminum tariffs on March 8, 2018, he instructed the  Secretary of Commerce to issue regulations explaining how American companies could seek exclusions from those tariffs no later than March 19, 2018, and that deadline has been met.  These new regulations can be found at:  https://www.commerce.gov/sites/commerce.gov/files/federal_register_vol_83_no_53_monday_march_19_2018_12106-12112.pdf

Before