Canada-U.S. Blog Trade Lawyers Cyndee Todgham Cherniak and Susan K. Ross

Category Archives: Immigration law

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August Civic Holiday: Survival Guide For Canada-US Cross Border Travel

Posted in Agriculture, Border Security, Customs Law, GST/HST, Immigration law, NEXUS, Personal Comments, Proceeds of Crime/Money Laundering

The August Civic Holiday long week-end will be here soon.  Canadians travel outside Canada to visit friends and family and to shop.  The Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) is on the lookout for contraventions of the Customs Act and other border laws. Here is our survival guide to make sure the CBSA is happy with your declaration and… Continue Reading

Trump Travel Restrictions: What Canadians And Canadian Residents And NEXUS Card Holders Need To Know

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Immigration law, Law Schools, NEXUS, Politics, U.S. Federal Government

On June 26, 2017, the United States Supreme Court unanimously overturned lower court decisions that delayed the implementation of President Trump’s Executive Order implementing travel restrictions against persons from 6 countries (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen). A limited version of President Donald Trump’s travel restrictions will go into effect Thursday morning (June 29).  The… Continue Reading

Iran Sanctions – Tit for Tat?

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Border Security, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Environment, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Government Procurement, Harmonization, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, Legal Developments, Politics, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, World Trade Organization

On Sunday, March 26, 2017, the Iranian State Agency (IRNA) announced the imposition of sanctions by Iran on 15 American companies.  While the move is widely seen as Iran responding to recent and on-going enforcement action taken in the U.S., such action is certainly creating ever more complex circumstances in the region. In explaining the… Continue Reading

Canada Commences Consultations Regarding A Canada-China Free Trade Agreement

Posted in Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Canada-China FTA, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border litigation, Cross-Border Real Estate, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, Environment, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Government Procurement, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, International Arbitrations, Labour, origin, tariff classification, valuation

On March 4, 2017, Global Affairs Canada announced consultations concerning a possible free trade agreement between Canada and China.   Consultations means that Global Affairs Canada is consulting with Canadian interested stakeholders (the free trade agreement negotiations have not started yet – Canada is in a preliminary exploratory stage). Global Affairs Canada has posted information on… Continue Reading

What Will Trudeau Talk To Trump About?

Posted in Agriculture, Border Security, Buy America, Canada's Federal Government, Canada-EU CETA, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Government Procurement, Harmonization, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, Labour, NAFTA, Softwood Lumber, State Governments, Trade Agreeements, U.S. Federal Government

On February 13, 2017, Prime Minister Trudeau will travel to the United States to visit with President Trump. The most important topic for discussion is that Canada-United States relationship. The most important goal is to ensure that trading relationshiop remains strong. This is a fun post, which is based on trade issues between Canada and the… Continue Reading

Thickening of the Border – What Is Canada’s Concern?

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, Exports, Harmonization, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, NEXUS, Politics, U.S. Supreme Court

The phrase “thickening of the border” equates with increased regulations and costs, which result in difficulties or slow-downs at the border such that goods and people move at the pace of molasses. Border wait times increase as new border charges are paid and shipments are inspected and border officers assess risks.  Any thickening of the… Continue Reading

What Is On Your NAFTA Renegotiation Wish List?

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Antidumping, Border Security, Buy America, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Energy, Government Procurement, GST/HST, Immigration law, Intellectual Property, Labour, NAFTA, NAFTA Chapter 11, origin, Politics, Provincial Governments, Softwood Lumber, Trade Agreeements, U.S. Federal Government

President Trump has said that he wants to renegotiate NAFTA.  Rather than taking a negative view of change, ask yourself “What is on my NAFTA Renegotation Wish List?”.  What changes to NAFTA could benefit your business?  What improvements to NAFTA can save your business money?  What adjustments will improve your business’ supply chain?  What should… Continue Reading

President Trump’s Entry Ban May Include Dual National Canadians

Posted in Immigration law, Uncategorized

On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order suspending entry into the United States of persons from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan or Yemen, as immigrants and nonimmigrants,  90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for… Continue Reading

What Does The Election of President Trump Mean For Canada?

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Buy America, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Elections, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Immigration law, NAFTA, Softwood Lumber, State Governments, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

On November 8, 2016, Donald Trump was elected President of the United States.  What does this mean for Canadian businesses in terms of trade? President-elect Trump has said he is opposed to the TransPacific Partnership Agreement (“TPP”).  It is highly unlikely that TPP will be ratified.  Canada will have to negotiate strategic bilateral free trade… Continue Reading

What Should Canadians Listen For While Watching the U.S. Presidential Debate

Posted in Antidumping, Border Security, Buy America, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Elections, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Immigration law, NAFTA, NAFTA Chapter 11, Politics, Softwood Lumber, State Courts, State Governments, Tax, Trade Agreeements, U.S. Federal Government, U.S. Supreme Court, World Trade Organization

Tonight is the first U.S. Presidential Debate.  Every 4 years, Canadian bureaucrats and those interested in politics watch the debates looking for clues as to what good and bad may be coming.  I thought it would be useful to make a list, from the perspective of a Canadian trade lawyer, of what Canadians should listen… Continue Reading

How To File A Complaint Against The Canada Border Services Agency

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, NEXUS

In writing this blog post, we are not advocating filing baseless, frivolous, vexatious and retaliatory complaints against Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) officers. However, we have learned from the experience of our clients that some legitimate complaints arise from time-to-time.  It is in the spirit of transparency and openness that we have decided to write… Continue Reading

What Is A “Customs Controlled Area”?

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Currency Reporting, Customs Law, Exports, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, NEXUS, origin, Personal Comments, Proceeds of Crime/Money Laundering, tariff classification, valuation

On April 27, 2016, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) released Guide BS5156 “What you need to know about Customs Controlled Areas”. In this one page document, the CBSA informs the public that a “customs controlled area” is: “A designated area where there is a likelihood that domestic employees or domestic origin travellers leaving Canada will come… Continue Reading

Canada Border Services Agency Revised Code of Conduct Is Published Online

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Currency Reporting, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, NEXUS, Personal Comments, Politics, Proceeds of Crime/Money Laundering

On August 16, 2016, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) posted its revised Code of Conduct, to which all CBSA officers must adhere. The three “values” pillars of the CBSA Code of Conduct are (1) Respect, (2) Integrity and (3) Professionalism. Respect The CBSA makes the following statements in the Code of Conduct regarding “Respect”: Respect… Continue Reading

What Can I Do If My NEXUS Card Is Confiscated By The CBSA?

Posted in Border Security, Customs Law, Immigration law, NEXUS

  The Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) may confiscate, revoke or cancel a NEXUS Membership for a number of reasons, such as (1) a breach of a customs law (e.g., undervaluation or not declaring goods purchased or acquired outside Canada), (2) a breach of an immigration law (e.g., working in Canada without a proper visa),… Continue Reading

Do Not Enter! Canada Is Rejecting Potential Immigrants Who Have Broken Foreign Export Controls Laws

Posted in Border Security, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Immigration law

On August 30, 2016, the Federal Court of Canada issued its judicial review decision in Mahmood Sajid v. The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, 2016 FC 981.  The Federal Court dismissed a judicial review application filed by Mr. Sajid to review a decision by Canada’s Refugee Protection Division (RPD) to vacate Mr. Sajid’s refugee protection. … Continue Reading

Canada’s Economic Sanctions And Admissibility Into Canada: Employees Of Designated Companies May Not Get Into Canada

Posted in Border Security, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Immigration law

An employee of a designated entity under Canada’s economic sanctions laws may be determined to be inadmissible into Canada and denied entry due to concerns that their employer is subject to sanctions.  In addition, an employee of an entity that is covered by economic sanctions of another country or countries (e.g., the United States, the… Continue Reading

Twelve Action Items Coming Out Of The Three Amigos June 29, 2016 NAFTA Meeting

Posted in Antidumping, Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports, Immigration law, Imports Restrictions, NAFTA, NEXUS, Politics, Softwood Lumber, Trade Agreeements, Transportation, U.S. Federal Government

On June 29, 2016, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, U.S. President Obama and Mexican President Peña Nieto met in Ottawa, Canada for the North American Leaders’ Summit.  Many press releases were issued – but most of the outside press related to the North American Climate, Clean Energy and Environment Partnership.  The Action Plan is yet… Continue Reading

What Businesses Should Know About Bill C-21 Amendments to Customs Act (Canada)

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Harmonization, Immigration law, Legal Developments, U.S. Federal Government

On June 15, 2016, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness introduced Bill C-21 “an Act to amend the Customs Act” in the Canadian House of Commons. It is a relatively short bill containing important and far-reaching amendments to the Customs Act.  Many people think that the Customs Act only affects them if they… Continue Reading

Canada’s New Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) – Do You Need An eTA to Fly To Canada?

Posted in Canada's Federal Government, Immigration law, U.S. Federal Government

Starting March 15, 2016, visa-exempt foreign nationals who fly to or transit through Canada will need an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA).  To find out whether you need an eTA, please go to the Government of Canada interactive web-site.  The Government of Canada has prepared a video about eTA requirements. What is the eTA Program? The… Continue Reading

The More Things Change – The More They Stay the Same

Posted in Immigration law, Legal Developments

Originally published by the California Fashion Association in January 2015 Authored by Howard D. Shapiro and David S. Rugendor, Edited by Susan Kohn Ross On November 20-21, 2014 President Obama announced “executive action” on immigration policy. These proposals were instantaneously controversial; businesses are left to ask – what does all of this mean to our… Continue Reading

Fifth Amendment Right Not Absolute

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Constitutional Law, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border litigation, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Immigration law, Intellectual Property, Law Schools, Law Students, Legal Developments, State Courts, U.S. Federal Government, U.S. Supreme Court

Silence can be used against an individual based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s holding in Salinas vs. Texas. As such, companies would do well to expand the training they provide to staff to all employees. The failure of individuals to fully understand their legal rights can lead to terrible consequences for those individuals and their… Continue Reading

California State Legislature Enacts Supply Chain Security Law

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Cross-border deals, Immigration law, State Governments, Transportation, Uncategorized

Are you covered by S657 – the new California law requiring retailers and manufacturers to inform the public about their efforts to combat slavery and human trafficking? Whether or not you think the California Legislature has improperly stuck its nose into international affairs, the fact remains the law takes effect on January 1, 2012. Human… Continue Reading