Canada-U.S. Blog Trade Lawyers Cyndee Todgham Cherniak and Susan K. Ross

Category Archives: Customs Law

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Women Traveling With Expensive Purses/Handbags May Expect The CBSA To Ask Questions

Posted in Customs Law, NEXUS

There is a trend at Montreal Trudeau International Airport – Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) officers are asking women who return to Canada with expensive purses (Dior, Prada, Coach, Channel, etc.) to go to secondary inspection.  In the Secondary Inspection Area, the CBSA officers accuse the woman of purchasing their purse/handbag on their most recent… Continue Reading

Canadian Manufacturers in the Agri-Food Sector Have an Opportunity to Eliminate Customs Duties

Posted in Agriculture, Canada's Federal Government, Customs Law

On April 22, 2016, the Federal Government of Canada (in particular, the Department of Finance) launched public consultations on the elimination of unrecoverable customs duties (MFN rate) payable on imported manufacturing ingredients by manufacturers in the agri-food sector.  The consultation were first announced in the 2016 Federal Budget. The submissions are due on or before… Continue Reading

Don’t Cross the Canada-US Border with a Fake/Real Grenade

Posted in Border Security, Canada's Federal Government, Criminal Law, Customs Law

I am not kidding – I should not have to write this blog post – The Government of Canada says “Please do not cross the border into Canada with a grenade in your vehicle.”  It does not matter if the grenade is fake/inert or real/live.  I am writing this because on April 21, 2016, three… Continue Reading

TFTEA – Export Focus

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Border Security, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, Legal Developments

In earlier editions of this blog, we first summarized the new law and then addressed the intellectual property rights changes it contained. Now, we turn to the export focused provisions in the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act (“TFTEA”). Mainly those export provisions have to do with information collection for targeting.  However, new initiatives for… Continue Reading

TFTEA – CBP Organizational Structure

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Legal Developments

Among its many provisions, the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act (“TFTEA” or the “Act”), H.R. 644, formally establishes U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) as a department within Homeland Security (“DHS”). Section 802(a) contains the key provisions. That section amends Section 411 of the Homeland Security Act and the U.S. Code to reflect the… Continue Reading

The Art of Self Defense

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Anti-Trust/Competition Law, Antidumping, Border Security, Buy America, Constitutional Law, Controlled Goods Program, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border litigation, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Cybersecurity and Privacy, Export Controls & Economic Sanctions, Exports, FCPA/Anti-Corruption, Government Procurement, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, International Arbitrations, Legal Developments, NAFTA, origin, tariff classification, Tax, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, Transportation, valuation, World Trade Organization

Corporate compliance programs come in all shapes and sizes and apply whether your company is privately owned or publicly traded. These internal controls take the form of accounting and audit procedures, import-export/regulatory policies, employment guidelines, ethics/anti-corruption initiatives and so on. The intent of any compliance program is to ensure that employees know what is expected… Continue Reading

More Tariff Reductions Coming In Canada As Promised in The 2016 Budget

Posted in Cross-border trade, Customs Law

Today, the Canadian Government tabled the 2016 Budget.  Hidden in the middle of the long document is the following statement about tariff reductions: “Supporting Manufacturers Through Tariff Relief Canadian manufacturers need a wide range of inputs to produce their high-quality products. Some of these manufacturing inputs are imported and may face tariffs when entering Canada…. Continue Reading

New Customs Bill Is Now Law

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Government Procurement, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, Trade Remedies

Originally published in the Journal of Commerce in March 2016 On February 24, 2016, President Obama signed into law H.R. 644. Entitled the “Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015,” it contains a good many technical revisions to existing Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) processes, procedures, laws and regulations. Much more is included, so… Continue Reading

Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 and Intellectual Property Rights

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Government Procurement, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, Trade Remedies

This article was co-authored with Kevin M. Rosenbaum of MS&K. On February 24, 2016, President Obama signed into law the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015, PL 114-125 (TFTEA), which includes an assortment of trade facilitation and trade enforcement provisions, including a number of provisions focused on intellectual property rights (IPR). Section III… Continue Reading

New Customs Bill Becomes Law

Posted in Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports, Government Procurement, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, NAFTA, origin, tariff classification, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies, Transportation, valuation

On February 24, 2016, H.R. 644 was signed into law by the President. While yet another trade-related bill was signed without any public ceremony, this new law contains a number of timely provisions. The first section deals with trade facilitation side-by-side with trade enforcement. The CBP Commissioner is directed to coordinate with the Director of… Continue Reading

The CITT Does Not Like Messy Appeals

Posted in Customs Law, Legal Developments, Legal Writing, origin, tariff classification, valuation

The Worldpac Canada v. President of the Canada Border Services Agency case (AP-2014-021) released by the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) on March 8, 2016 contains a few paragraphs that do not hide the CITT’s frustration with the appeal paperwork in this case.  Member Downey states in the Reasons: “… the Tribunal also wishes to… Continue Reading

What Is A “Blanket Authorization” And Why Does It Matter?

Posted in Customs Law, origin, tariff classification, Uncategorized, valuation

According to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“CITT”) in Worldpac Canada v. President of the Canada Border Services Agency, AP-2014-021 (Order and Reasons released on February 18, 2016 and posted on the CITT website on March 8, 2016), a “blanket authorization” is a “mechanism involving a specific process by which an importer can apply to… Continue Reading

A Mistake That People Make After Getting Into Trouble With The CBSA

Posted in Customs Law, NEXUS

I often receive calls from individuals who have had their NEXUS membership cards cancelled or confiscated by the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”). Many of these individuals believe that the CBSA was sympathetic  to their situation and was trying to help when the CBSA officer suggested that they write a letter explaining their side of… Continue Reading

Trans-Pacific Partnership: Bane or Boon?

Posted in Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, origin, Trade Agreeements, Trade Remedies

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in November 2015 As every international trader worth his/her salt knows, the text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership was released on November 5th. Given word from the Executive Branch is the agreement is still being “scrubbed”, it is reasonable to conclude the text is not yet final, but is… Continue Reading

Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations Concluded – Now What?

Posted in Corporate Counsel, Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Government Procurement, Imports Restrictions, Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, origin, Trade Agreeements

Originally published by the Journal of Commerce in October 2015 With the news the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations have been successfully concluded, the obvious question is what is next? The Republican leadership in the House of Representatives is in chaos. As we go to press, the presumptive new Speaker has withdrawn, the caucus is coming… Continue Reading

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Has ACE Up Its Sleeve

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports, Government Procurement

A version of this article was also published by the Journal of Commerce in February 2016. What a difference a few days make! Up until Monday, February 8th, it was understood that on February 28th, CBP entries, and those filed with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and… Continue Reading

ACE Deadline Reminder for Imports and Exports

Posted in Aerospace & Defence, Agriculture, Antidumping, Border Security, Corporate Counsel, Criminal Law, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Exports

On February 28, 2016, those involved with imports and exports are preparing to undergo a major transition. As of that date, all entries must be filed using the new Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) system. ACE not only replaces the current Customs and Border Protection (CBP) system, but is designed to reengineer CBP’s operational processes; develop… Continue Reading

What is an Ascertained Forefeiture by the Canada Border Services Agency?

Posted in Customs Law

An ascertained forefeiture is a monetary penalty levied by the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) when a CBSA officer believes on reasonable grounds that a person has imported goods into Canada illegally (or without reporting the goods). An ascertained forfeiture occurs when the goods cannot actually be seized (because the good cannot be located or… Continue Reading

How To Prove Origin Of Goods To the CBSA

Posted in Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, origin, Trade Agreeements

On January 21, 2015, “the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) posted on the CBSA web-site D-Memorandum D11-4-2 “Proof of Origin of Imported Goods” (stated to be published on January 13, 2016).  This policy statement informs importers about what documents the CBSA will accept as proof of origin of goods. Pursuant to section 35.1 of the… Continue Reading

Advancement of Expert Testimony Rules Before The Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Posted in Antidumping, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, Legal Developments, origin, tariff classification, valuation

On December 21, 2015 (published on the CITT web-site January 12, 2016), the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (“Tribunal”) issued its tariff classification/refund decision in EMCO Corporation Westlund v. The President of the Canada Border Services Agency (CITT File No. AP-2014-042).  There is an interesting issue hidden in the case – whether a witness qualifies as… Continue Reading

How To Apply For An Advance Customs Ruling in Canada

Posted in Cross-border deals, Cross-border trade, Customs Law, tariff classification

Many importers in Canada want to minimize the risk of an assessment of customs duties for getting a tariff classification incorrect.  If an importer or exporter or foreign producer of goods cannot figure out how the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) would classify a good for customs duty tariff classification purposes, sometimes the best thing… Continue Reading

Pet Toys Are Not Classified For Customs Purposes The Same As Humans’ Toys in Canada

Posted in Customs Law, tariff classification

Even though I am amused at my puppy playing with her toys, the Canada Border Services Agency (“CBSA”) does not classify pet toys under H.S. Code 95.03 unless there is an identical toy for humans.  In Pet Valu Canada Inc v D/MNR (CITT File No. AP-97-017 and AP-97-053, AP-97-102, and AP-97-118) (which is an old… Continue Reading